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The azalea that is paler than the others, the hydrangea that just doesn’t seem to be growing or a dogwood that barely blooms; we all have that one plant that just isn’t happy.  Like an unmotivated 15 year old teenager, sometimes they just need a kick in the butt.  

As I have mentioned before sometimes a plant isn’t happy dues to environmental issues like moisture and sun light, and should be moved. If you have a problem plant, and don’t think it’s a cultural issue, here’s a kick-in-the-butt trick to try this spring.

As you know a plant’s roots are responsible for taking up moisture and nutrients from the soil. Common sense says more roots increase the ability to feed the plant.  Combining Bio Tone (with mycorrhizal fungi) together with worm casting will not only help expand the roots’ intake abilities, it will increase the amount of nutrients available.

Stat by using a drill or a wood stake to make holes surrounding the plant or tree we want to boost.  Using the drip line (outside diameter) of the foliage about a dozen holes about 8 inches deep We are wanting to be near the same depth as the plant’s roots, so for trees you might want to go about a foot deep.  1” to 1-1/2” diameter holes will suffice.  Using a bucket or wheel barrow, mix the Bio Tone and Mr. Natural Complete landscape Mix roughly 1 part Bio Tone to three parts Complete Landscape Mix.  Pour or rake the mixture into the holes, and you might want to use a stake  or rod to pack the mixture in.  That’s it.

The mycorrhizal fungi will attaches  to the plant roots, and then rather quickly spreads through the soil feeding nutrients and moisture to the roots.  The worm castings (worm poop) adds nutrients that are readily available.

With this approach you should see results this first spring and summer.

The Bio Tone is also recommended when you are planting new plants.  Vegetables, annuals, perennials, shrubs and trees will all get established quicker as well as require less watering and fertilizing.